Marina Nagbina

Understanding roots of conflict

Deepening our understanding of Indigenous and Western worldviews requires k̓əɬʕac̓xəntm. We look under the obvious, which sometimes takes us to the very beginning of time and the creation of the universe. The conflict between Indigenous and Western societies is rooted in divergent worldviews originating at creation times. The origins of authority and law emerge from […]

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The Trajectory of Awesomeness: Your preparation journey toward Ethical Space

TRAJECTORY OF AWESOMENESS™Establishing Ethical Space based relations Ethical Space is both a journey and a destination—and the Trajectory of Awesomeness is your guide. Created by Gwen, the Trajectory of Awesomeness is a set of preparatory steps for getting to the best possible Indigenous engagement by expanding your knowledge and skills for Ethical Space-based relations. The

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Indigenous engagement capacity development for your organization, with new virtual training options coming soon!

At the IEI, our signature workshop is our annual 2.5-day retreat, this year taking place in October on the beautiful homelands of the Lakota in Spearfish, South Dakota. But did you know that we also offer Ethical Space capacity development training for US and Canadian government, philanthropic and industry leaders? These workshops are suited for

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Indigenous knowledge included for the first time on a continental scale

As part of our involvement in the USGS Biodiversity and Climate Change Assessment Guidance Committee, Gwen and James have been contributing to USGS Guiding Principles for the Consideration of Indigenous Knowledge Inclusion, recently attending the all-authors meeting from late April to early May. The Indigenous team of the Transboundary Policy Options chapter developed guiding principles

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Conservation isn’t free

Conservation finance is a key strategy for achieving the commitments of the Global Biodiversity Framework, as well as other American, Canadian and transboundary climate change, biodiversity and conservation agreements. Many financing options are being discussed and developed and frequently, Indigenous Peoples are advanced as the leaders that will implement these finance mechanisms. “Indigenous-led” is a

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Indigenous data sovereignty

Indigenous Peoples assert their sovereignty today by defining and leading initiatives that govern the collection, storage and use of their community’s knowledge, information and data. These actions of Indigenous Data Sovereignty set the expectations and standards for data governance globally. It is critical that researchers, institutions, funders and governments work together to implement policies and

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North Dakota Badlands

Tribal Climate Knowledge guides us all 

In April, Gwen and James presented at the Affiliated Tribes of the Northwest Indians Tribal Climate Leaders Summit in Washington. Among the 500 people representing 120 Tribal Nations in attendance, a common theme emerged: food sovereignty practices are a critical means of climate change adaptation, biodiversity protection and cultural resilience. On the ground, Tribes and First Nations prioritize

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